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society, and you look at this map and you look at europe and russia. >> yes. europe is not just a debt crisis. we've been narcissistically focusing on a debt crisis. it's the western extrim city of the super continent and most changes in europe over the mill len ya have come from the east. they've come from the influx of peoples throughout the east. and we thought we had defeated that with the end of the cold war, that russia was out of it. but that's not the case. precisely because this belt of countries from estonia to bull gary are right next door to russia. russia will continue to be a factor in europe's evolution. if you look at russia, it's half the longitudes of the world but it's got less people than ban ga desh. it's been invaded by poles, electricity yanians, swedes. so russia still requires buffer zones in eastern europe and the caucuses. vladimir putin is not the totalitarian eastern giant the western union paints him as. his ne-yo imperialism is a function of his jeep geographical insecurity. poland, here in blue, may emerge as the real pivot state because, again, there's
won. that is the first myth. frankly, of russia won it. secondly common and and and and now we have the atomic bomb. new -- secondly, we have the atomic bomb. these are myths we explode, but what results is this believe we are always in the right, and it has gotten worse from generation to generation. tavis: if oliver is right and we engage in this self love, what makes you think that of bowdon -- a book that they are going to want to digest that? >> you do not think it is going to change the world? we just want to start a conversation. we think people in the united states have not studied their history. the national report card, most americans think the united states is sufficient -- is deficient in math and science. high school seniors are weakest in u.s. history, and the public in general knows very little u.s. history. tavis: what makes you think we are ready for that conversation now. >> the united states is in a transitional time. we cannot dictate all over the world. we are just in the process of losing two major wars. it is a terrible war. if the united states gets involved
meaningful contributions now? the contribution does not have to be militarily? russia, i would suggest, should be called upon to step up and belly up to the u.n. security council. they should exert influence. day, i suggest, are the most influential at this time, and they have the ability, number one, to stop supporting this regime that is slaughtering its citizens, to stop, by its acquiescence, standing on the sidelines and letting it happen while the rest of the world realize its hands. >> how do you accomplish that? >> i think they can assert influence in syria. they are one of the few countries that really can at this point. iran, forget it. >> how? what they can support the security camera resolutions, which thus far we have been unable to achieve -- security council resolutions, which we have been unable to achieve. >> what i think we are talking about here is, where do we intervene? where do we not? what is the rationale for doing so or to not do so? i think it's got to be based on one fundamental principle -- our interests, our values, and our values are our interests. i say ab
. not to cross it, because that might bring china into the war. not to do anything to aggravate russia. russia was greedy for any colonies, anything it could grab. and i am not going to give you the atom bomb. you are not going to be able to use it. three things he was told. macarthur said, do not worry, the chinese are not coming in. he got our army up to the 38th parallel. a decision was made. the white house knew -- they decided to cross the parallel to get into north korea and destroy the north korean army. this was an agreed upon decision. we did indeed push back the north koreans. but it triggered the chinese, who came rushing in, hundreds of thousands, truman said, i was promised they would not come in. intelligence told macarthur this would not happen. here we are, fighting hundreds of thousands of chinese. they pushed us all the way back. >> back to seoul? >> beyond. they took seoul back. macarthur started to give press conferences. he asked for the use of the bomb. truman said now. truman did not think -- instead of calling macarthur back, he decided to fly to wake island. he sat wit
in syria. we've seen three security council vetoes by russia and china causing many to call the u.n., essentially, ineffective in this crisis. so it's been the interplay of these three factors, i would argue, that has led syria down the path that it has taken. in terms of u.s. policy, u.s. policy is based on the objective of having assad, as president obama called for, step aside. this was back in august of 2011. the problem with u.s. policy is that it has continually been at conflict with itself in terms of how to achieve that objective while also achieving or protecting u.s. national security interests in the region. namely, i would argue, very understandable concerns about, about the impact of unseating assad and the potential for massive instability across the region. so at the crux of u.s. policy on syria, i would argue, has resided this tension of wanting assad to go but being concerned and fearful about how to achieve that objective while also seeking to maintain stability in such a volatile region of the world. now, the debate right now on syria is focused largely on this
countries like china and russia, along with our traditional allies and a number of other states across the world have stepped up to impose the sanctions together. and you saw in the intervention in libya. we're not only our traditional european allies but our arab friends also stepped in to intervene in their own backyard. that is not leading from behind. that is leading in a way that enables others to step up, share the burdens, and be part of the solution. i think that, you know, this president has adopted a very strong and smart approach to the american leadership using all of the instruments of our national power. the military, when we must, but also much stronger on diplomacy, economic instruments and so forth. when it comes to defense and defense spending, i think this is a big difference between the two campaigns. this president has put forward a very, you know, a defense budget that is strategic in that sense it is driven by strategy but it's also driven by the legal constraints of the law that has been put in place, the budget control act those passed by a bipartisan majority
blast of cold air coming in out of eastern china, also eastern russia here. you see all that cloud cover coming in. well, that's actually producing some snowfall on top of what you already saw over the weekend in portions of northern honshu, even off towards hokkaido. it's not just the snowfall here. some severe weather is erupting along the cold front. you could be seeing strong to thunderstorms here, even a tornado or two cannot be completely ruled out with this storm system as it continues to push overhead. the good news, it is pushing off to the east and much of western japan, even on the east coast around tokyo, you're going to be seeing drier weather in place mainly due to a high pressure continuing to ridge in fro the west, actually across much of china you're already seeing fair weather in place here. that cold air from the north is creating dense and heavy fog. do slow down on the roads if you're out there driving about. but some afternoon thunderstorms still going to be popping up here and also down towards the philippines and the indochina peninsula. for the tropics, temperatu
's recovering from her injuries in britain. >>> the leaders of vietnam and russia have agreed to talk sea trade talks next year. russian prime minister and his counterpart announced the plan on wednesday in hanoi. economic and trade cooperation between the two countries has been steadily rising. medved said he hopes to get an increase in bilateral trade, that would bring total trade to about $7 billion in 2015. the two leaders also agreed to boost military cooperation. vietnam is engaged in territorial disputes with china in the south china sea. it's keen to bolster defenses amid china's growing maritime presence. >>> and that's going to do it for us this week. thanks for watching. we'll see you again next week on "asia 7 days."
the supply delivery business to russia, they left the gulf, those small number of advisors in saudi arabia and in iran stuck around for decades, and it's that role that really represented america's influence that stemmed from world war ii, the pro longed war in the gulf. >> host: professor, i think of the british when i think of the involvement in the middle east. when and how did they step back their involvement? >> guest: well, with regard to the gulf, the brits arrived in the 1800s. and it represented their quest to provide order to a part of -- on the flanks to their imperial interests in india. the southern coast of the gulf had been called in the 1800s, the pirate coast, and the constantly feuding tribes fused with one another, which spill out into the sea-born approaches to india, and result in attacks on india, and possibly resulting weakness that might bring another great power. so the british found themselves pulled into the gulf in the 1800s. not to colonize as they did further to the east in india but, rather to maintain order there, and they did, with a relatively small amount
teenage daughter, she said, what's wrong with russia? i said it's not russia, the soviet union. she said once that? that it was a big thing back there in the late '80s and early 90s before it toppled. we were geared up to fight in the most of us had never really considered iraq on yahoo! saddam hussein was. and after that war was over, which when he was a foregone conclusion. the terrorism thing took us all by surprise but we just thought they were gravel rows, never give them too much credit. all the buildings at khobar towers were built by the bin laden construction company. they have the bin laden stands and all the -- how's that for irony? but after that things kind of change. the world trade center bombings and september 11, of course we all know what happened that day. i was actually flying that morning. we had come back from the middle east from another rotation. monday, september 10 was her first day back. and the morning of september 11 i was actually falling, and i've come down very, very early, and somebody said you've got to look at this. i've been everything as i looked at t
, the house had one bill on the agenda, the bill that would normalize u.s. trade relations with russia and that passed by a vote of 365-43. the senate has yet to take up their version of the measure. a capitol hill reporter fills in the details. >> sports of this bill normalizing trade relations with russia are saying it's long overdue and good for the nation's economy. why is that? >> well, it >> it will hopefully double exports to russia from the united states. it will go across a broad group of products. manufacturers are backing it strongly. it could be airplanes and parts associated with that. locomotives, chemicals, food, clothing. it seems russia likes u.s. products. we expect there to be good and quick growth. >> how is lining up to oppose it? >> it has wide support on capitol hill. even the administration backs the bill. it does seem to have broad support across washington and the country for businesses that want to export products to russia. >> with all of the legislation and that remains to be done in the lame-duck session, this is the first one. what are the prospects in th
a nuclear threat was a problem. but the cold war focused on russia and the united states. so fast forward. you have vietnam. vietnam san adventure on to itself in terms of north and south vietnam. many of you in this room may have served in vietnam. then you moved fast forward and we were going have russia. the berlin wall came down and we were going to get some benefits of that peace dividends. peace was not big run rush it was a multiple stand. pick a stand. they became a challenge in stability of government, stability of resources and stability of the data we knew about those particular companies. move on forward, 9/11 happens. every one of you remember when you were. i was on the steps of the pentagon. i little literally walked out of the building that day. i was there for a meeting. i remember hearing on that gorgeous blue day an absolute eerie sound. it was like a plane had taken a wrong turn. i didn't know it was a plane because planes go up and down the potomac river. i am of the bottom of the stairs. the plane hit the building. i did not know where i was sitting that two other pl
in all of these great events and really influencing american policy toward russia and having to worry about that, and yet at the same time he was concerned about my welfare and whether or not i was learning anything. c-span: there was a moment in the book you describe where you went to his house, and you were supposed to go to see him -- i think he was up on the third floor, and you caught him watching "the dick van dyke show." what was so unusual about that? >> guest: that was such a fantastic memory for me because nixon always claimed that he never watched television, and of course he did. he liked to watch the news. he watched sporting events. he used to watch football and baseball quite avidly. but he never admitted to watching sort of mindless entertainment. so i was usually about five minutes late for our meetings at the residence in the afternoon, so he normally expected me to be late. and this one day in particular i was five minutes early, and i was walking up the stairs, and before i could clear the stairs to the third floor, i heard the television going. and then i heard ca
four months. she landed in kazakhstan tonight along with astronauts from japan and russia. president barack obama monitoring the conflict in the middle east as he travels through asia. today in thailand, he said the u.s. is working with all parties to end violence. he made history becoming the first u.s. president to visit myanmar. the president wraps up his three-nation asian tour with a stop in cambodia. >>> state department updating hugh it deploys security for diplomatic facilities around the globe now. secretary of state hillary clinton and the defense department will monitor where forces are deployed so they can travel to help during emergencies, if needed. the change comes amid congressional hearings over how the obama administration handled security crisis in benghazi, libya. i'm don lemon. see you back here at 10 p.m. eastern. fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your
combined. china, russia, france, the united kingdom, you name it, next ten. >> reporter: sequestration would not change that according to the center for strategic and budgetary assessment, it is not the size of the cuts, about $50 billion a year that would be so damaging but the fact that they would be across-the-board. panetta adds that except for military pay every program from the joint strike fighter military band was be cut by the same amount, 23%. >> it's absolutely a foolish thing to do. if you want to cut the defense budget that's fine. this is a foolish way to do it. >> reporter: in other words, if the pentagon were allowed to pick and choose its cuts sequestration might not be the disaster secretary panetta is predicting. david martin, cbs news, the pentagon. >> glor: pentagon contractors aren't the only one in with a stake in this debate. 120,000 small contractors take part in the federal marketplace. a market worth $500 billion. lowell vant slot is scrambling to run every conceivable raanning scenario for 2013. he's the military contracts manager for u.s. technologies which
multinational meetings of countries who oppose the scheme, including meetings that took place in russia and the united states. the bill before us directs the secretary of transportation to prohibit u.s. aircraft operators from participating in this illegal scheme. the bill also directs appropriate u.s. government officials to negotiate a worldwide approach to address aircraft emissions and to take appropriate actions to hold u.s. civil operators harmless from the e.u. emissions trading scheme. the e.u. needs to slow down, carefully weigh its decision to include international civil aviation in its emissions trading scheme. a better approach would be to work with the international civil aviation community through the u.n. international civil aviation organization to establish consensus-driven initiatives to reduce airline emissions. i'm pleased to see movement on the part of the e.u. to work with international community at i.k.o. to seek a global approach to civil aviation emissions. while the post ponement for a year is a positive sign, it's not enough to ensure u.s. operators won't be n
called a nuclear threat was a real problem. during those days, the cold war really focused on russia at the united states, the two powerhouses. fast forward, you have vietnam. vietnam is an adventure into itself in terms of north and south vietnam. many of you may have served. and you move fast forward and we're going to have russia, the berlin wall came down. we will have benefits of that -- of the peace dividend. it was multiple stands. pick a stand. it became a challenge in terms of stability of government resources and the data we knew about this particular companies. move on forward, 9/11 happened. everyone of you remember is where you were on 9/11. i was on the steps of the pentagon. i literally walked out of the building that day and i was there for meeting and remember hearing on that gorgeous blue day and absolute eerie sound. like a plane had taken a wrong turn. lo and behold, the next thing i knew i was on the bottom stairs and i am thinking, how did i get from the top to bottom of the stairs? the plane hit the building. i did not know in where i was sitting at that point
stands on russia and china and iran where he says president obama should have backed the iranian democracy movement and imposed tougher sanctions on iran sooner. >> in my opinion, the president's mistakes on iran are in part responsible for the fact that iran is closer to a nuclear weapon today than it was when he was elected. >> the one word i would use to describe his foreign policy would be tough minded. >> and on august 11th, 2012, in norfolk, virginia, the final piece of the romney campaign falls into place. >> president obama promised to begin to slow the rise of the oceans. and to heal the planet. my promise is to help you and your family. >> with the nomination in hand >> this is not about me. it's not about him. this is about america, the country we love. it's in trouble. it needs our help. >> come november 6th, the american voters will make their decision. >> thank you so much.
, that the united states had the responsibility to protect the independence of nations from communistic russia. this may south vietnam. now, kennedy had raised troop levels. i won't go into all the things that truman and eisenhower did, but right alone, we are very heavily involved in protect and south vietnam and johnston believed that these prior commitments committed him. he also is a strong cold war era. he is to comment on how the young people protesting simply didn't understand communism because they'd never grown up or had to fight world war ii. they didn't know what appeasement meant in munich, you know, chamberlain forth. the united states must keep its commitments. it was johnson's great misfortune when you either had to fish. kennedy didn't have to do it. >> host: you are referring of course to the nominal theory. >> guest: is a very good cold warrior, but i never bought the domino theory. because this has always made every disappeared histories that this is america thinking that you put up a solid wall. not just united front, the sheer method is just no opposition on these issues a
a nuclear threat was a real problem. but during those days, the cold war really focused on russia and the united states. two powerhouses. so fast toward, you have a vietnam. many of you may have served in vietnam. then you fast forward and we were going to have russia, the berlin wall came down. we were going to get some benefits of that peace dividend. peace dividend in the intelligence community was multiple stance. so picky stand, they became a challenge in terms of one's ability of government, stability of resources and data we know about those particular companies. move on forward, 9/11 happens. everyone of you in this room remembers where you work. i was on the steps of the pentagon. i literally walked out of the building and was there for a meeting and i remember hearing on that gorgeous day an eerie sound. it was like a plane took a wrong turn but i did not know it was a plane. because planes go up and down the potomac regularly. the next thing i knew, i was on the bottom of the stairs and i'm thinking how they get from the top to the bottom of the stairs? the plane had hi
korea, north korea, russia and japan all have leadership succession or elections during that year. it inevitably makes the top leaders focused inward on leadership issues, very unwilling to appear to be in any way weak abroad and so forth. 2013 is the opposite. you would expect the new leaders knowing they have to deal with each other for years to come potentially have a more positive agenda looking forward. how do we build something that's not going to impose high costs is and have few benefits? every one of those leaders has enormous domestic problems that they have to confront, and they want some more space to pursue that. so i think there's an underlying, you know, the kind of underlying tectonic plates are moving at a somewhat different direction in 2013. obviously, specific events can throw that out of whack, and if you look at the details, they're pretty tough. on xi personally, you know, he has evinced some, you know, he has some exposure to the u.s., he seems to enjoy being here when he's been here, he has good relations with vice president biden and so forth. he seems to
critical level. this here comment usaid was booted out of russia initially when i went there to help the russian people, one of the first things they did with the help of the russians to two extreme poverty. my question is, is the risk too much for us so that we would basically go winhelp the nation and state thank you and don't let the door hit you on the way out? thank you. >> first of all, the indonesian case, part of that is just cultural. they are far more sensitive to questions of faith than we are. so it's not infrequent that we would behave in a way that doesn't take into account adequately their cultural sensitivities. but this happens all the time in life and i think you have to ask yourself what's the right thing to do and you try and do it. if you make your very best effort and someone isn't appreciative, you didn't do anything wrong. don't worry about it. and sometimes that happens. i wouldn't hesitate to help people because someone related to a recipient is resentful that they weren't helped by their own kind. i would want to help. >> if i could have something to the in
it from three sides, britain, russia, the u.s. it's a whole different ball game when you look at three interests. russian eyes, english eyes, chinese eyes. if you can see history and have empathy for others, you broaden your compassion, and you broaden. we become a member of the world. of the global community. and this is what obama has not done. now, he's basically operating as an outlier now. you asked about our criticism, it's couched in the context of 120 years of history. we started in 1900, we end now. it's a lot. and we start -- we mentioned woodrow wilson, world war ii, saying america is the savior of the world. we show that this mission to be a global policeman starts a long time ago. but it grows dangerous after the atomic bomb in 1945. >> it's a fascinating project. thoroughly enjoy the book. it's a riveting history lesson. you bring this stuff to life. i commend you. >> thank you. >> the unhold history of the united states is on showtime. the book is available now. we'll be right back. [ male announcer ] you build a reputation by not breaking down. consider the silverado 15
. the legislative agenda this week includes discussion with trade of russia. live coverage of the house is here on c-span. also at 2:00 eastern live coverage of the senate as members resume consideration of a sportsman bill. off the floor this week members ofts congress will hold hearings on the terrorist in benghazi attack that killed leaders. and a meeting with president obama about fiscal issues. in a few moments a book tv event with paula brot we will. petraeus designed after an f.b.i. investigation uncovered an extramarital affair. then a forum with two med doll of honor recipients and the joint chiefs of staff retired general richard myers. several live events to tell you about tomorrow morning t. new america foundation hosts a discussion on how going over the fiscal cliff would effect the military, social security and medicare. that's on c-span2 at 9:00 eastern. at 10:00 eastern on c-span 3 looks at al qaeda groups in yemen. >> c-span invites middle and high school students to send a message to the president through a short video let the president know what's the most important issue he shoul
of russia initially when they went there to help the russian people, one of the first things they did with the help of the russians to two extreme poverty. my question is, is a risk too much for us so that we would a sickly state thank you and to let the door his shoe on the way out. >> obviously an indonesian case, part of that is just their farm are sensitive to questions of faith and we are so it's not infrequent we would behave in a way that doesn't take into account adequately their cultural sensitivities. this happens all the time and life. what's the right thing to do if someone isn't appreciative you didn't do anything wrong. don't worry about it and sometimes that happens. i wouldn't hesitate to help people unless someone related to the recipient weren't helped by their own kind. i would like to help. >> and i could add something to the indonesian case, there's a thing that exacerbated the relationship that made us were challenging for the ambassador. i'm sure we were still there when he was president wesley had a a policy decision here in the u.s. regarding the military enga
in power and maintain control over at least part of syria and that of course is russia and iran and the result would be al-assad steven pour and the victory which is not going to be good for our simultaneous efforts to try to move iran to the negotiating table to seize the nuclear weapons, and in white portions of syria, a no-man's land rather like the fata of somalia where the militants perhaps probably associated with al qaeda would find a new home. we already see some of this. this is another reason why the administration needs to engage in putting in beijing through military means if necessary the merkley or indirectly through providing weapons and things like no-fly zones. we need to do more and we need to do more urgently or this is great to slip out of control. at best -- and it isn't very good at sifry at salles -- at worst we are going to see any emerging sunni shia fisher across the middle east would be followed by violence and fighting in iraq and elsewhere. let me touch on iraq. it hasn't received too much commentary either in the debates in the campaign or even some
, south america. whether it's china, russia, turkey. respect regional powers. >> so the arguments on the part of anybody, no international organization should listen to any arguments about going into syria or supporting the rebels in syria, in your judgment. >> in the syrian interest story -- first of all, we've got to get our intelligence correct. we don't know exactly what's happened in syria and i don't think we should fight a war on that. as to international organizations, it would be a good idea for us to join one. we are the only nation that has resisted the united nations . >> i only do this because we have a time clock here. great to see you. >> four parts. oliver stone always has an interesting take. >> unboring. >> yes, unboring. it's true. >>> instagram is kachanging the way that we see the world. we'll ask kevin systrom how his photo sharing site ended up [ libe ] le dnkrae ic oha lonn wer. eat moaue sghti ecic evs smeos n usac esi. th emesttso arow douan gw ouenelac w qteuris, lyews urxpur aayhath c dtoou 'sui aesn ard. dti romnd th iserome beusitel tstngen e am. r
phone, we brought in china, india and russia. again, secretary of state would have to go two or three times a year. we also articulate we would maintain our force levels. we got off to a good start. but i can only say that we partially succeeded in elevating the importance of asia. partly because even i was at the time in his and other economies was coming, was not crystal-clear as it is today. and partly because secretary and the president kept getting dragged akin to other issues. you asked about the presence the. he thought the issue was important. he realized the importance of trade and so on. the first couple years of his initiation of clinton focus on the domestic economy which by the what was the most single important thing you can do for your foreign policy, above all today. so, and christopher spent a lot of time in asia and went out, secretary christopher, to the region, but he often would get subsumed in the bosnia crisis. we have somalia and haiti and other crises in the middle east. and so although we raise the profile, i don't think we were able to succeed, certainly as
? ahead of russia by 2020? >> yeah. one of the ironies is over the last couple of years, the oil industry, fossil fuel, the evil fossil fuel created so many jobs and so much wealth. look at pennsylvania alone, you got to worry about them coming under attack, particularly natural gas. you got a big hollywood movie coming out, anti-fracking and all that stuff. >> steve: the president later today will meet interestingly with union leaders and business leaders, tomorrow he'll meet with ceo's and congress and try to avert the fiscal cliff. what do you make of the meeting with the union guys? >> i got a huge beef with this. unions represent only 8% of sec. there is no way in the world they should be the first ones up. by the way, this is all look just like his jobs council. nothing but academics, union leaders and gigantic businesses. where is the small business? guys, let me tell you, businesses with less than 50 please created 13,000 jobs. where would the president and the country be without them? they never get a seat at the able. we crush them, we crush any hope for recovery. >> brian: we'l
russia and communist china. this rancher works dawn to dusk, drives a 12 yearly truck and earns less than a typical bureaucrat in washington, d.c yet the federal government considers him rich enough to pay a death tax. >> there is no way financially my kids can pay what the irs will demand from them nine months after death and keep this ranch intact. >> the idea hyped the estate tax is prevent the very wealthily from accumulating vast fortunes and passing it on to the next generation. >> to the analyst, that's not the american farmer. >> a poster child for the estate tax would be paris hilton, celebrity, but also hotel repair res. >> currently the federal government taxes estates worth $5 million and up at 35%. when the bush era tax cuts expire in january, rates increase to 55% on estates of a million dollars or more. while some republicans want to eliminate the death tax entirely, the president proposes a 45% rate on estates of $3.5 million and up. >> if we are burdened with millions of dollars of estate tax, it forces the breakup of ranches and farms and it's not good for the environmen
with the russians on making sure their interests are addressed in syria. i do not think russia is wedded to assad. may be establishing a no-fly zone from turkey, may be providing direct military assistance, but something to break the region's debt lot. syria cannot afford for a long time much of the destruction that it is undertaking. my last point has to do with peace. rob cover this up. i have said this for awhile and i will say it again, very and diplomatically, it is peace now or never. i understand all the difficulties that the u.s. president will face in trying to bring this to conflict resolution. i understand the priority of this issue is not in terms of other u.s. priorities domestically. i understand the president is facing hard-line israeli government not interested in my view in 8 two-state solution that is viable, a week palestinian government that does not have what it takes to come to an arrangement. i understand all this. i also understand if something drastic is not done today, we will lose this opportunity probably forever. one has to choose between the difficult and the impossi
tarpaulin. russia, switzerland and france, experts opened the grave. they didn't actually have to remove the body but removed samples from the body and closed the grave again. all we saw out here was a ceremony, very solemn one, where palestinian leaders laid flowers to commemorate the late palestinian leader yasser arafat. what they're looking for, as you said quite rightly, is a poison. pl plunonium 2010. the palestinians, of course, have long accused israel of poisoning yasser arafat. israelis not willing to comment on that. palestinians say they hope this investigation will get them some clarity. carol? >> fred pleitgen, reporting live from the west bank this morning. >>> chris christie says he's finally able to look beyond the devastation unleashed on his state by superstorm sandy and says the long recovery home has convinced him to run for re-election next year. storm victims have been asking about his plans. >> this weekend, mary pat and i, the kids, had an opportunity to just kind of have a few minutes to ourselves. and we talked about it. and we've decided we're going to seek re
, switzerland, and russia here to watch that process and to take tests. this is all happening just as everyone commemorates the advisory, the eight-year anniversary of arafat's death. his family very upset and there has always been suspicion that arafat was murdered when he died in a french hospital in 2004. sara sidner, cnn, ramallah. >>> happening now. spreading scandal. new claims about general john allen's contacts with the woman who helped trigger the david petraeus investigation. also, another surprising new twist leads back to petraeus' former lover, paula broadwell and her e-mail trail. >>> and the president's staffing up for his second term. he appears blindsided by this sensational mess. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> the top u.s. military commander in afghanistan appears to be fighting back, trying not to be brought down by scandal, as general david petraeus was. general john allen is under investigation by the defense department, and his nomination to be the military head of nato is now on hold. at issue, allen's contacts with jill kelly, who played a role in
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